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    Britons’ bad hygiene kicks up a stink


    Whiffy waiters had better watch out; new research by Mira Showers reveals that the British public would least like to encounter someone who needed a shower serving them in a restaurant.

    This topped a poll of Brits in which almost a third (27 per cent) agreed, beating the 22 per cent of people who would least like to encounter somebody who needed a shower in bed. Other unpopular places to run in to someone who smells unsavoury were on public transport (18 per cent), in a meeting and on a plane (tied at 10 per cent).

    The study was conducted as part of Mira Showers' annual research into the washing habits of the nation, which asked 1,000 UK adults to reveal the grubby truths about what goes on behind closed bathroom doors.

    Britain's Dirty Hot-spots
    The grime index also identified which cities in the UK are filthiest, with Liverpool topping the list for the percentage of inhabitants who confessed to going three days or more without bathing or showering. A shocking 58% of Liverpudlians admitted to this, knocking last year's dirtiest city Belfast off the top spot. The UK's cleanest city is Cardiff, where only 28% people said they had gone three days or more without washing.

    Dirtiest cities in the UK and Ireland:

    1. Liverpool - 58%
    2. Glasgow - 57%
    3. Belfast - 52%
    4. Cheltenham - 50%
    5. Nottingham - 53%

    Filthy Secrets
    Overall, twenty-one per cent of dirty Brits said that they only wash every other day, and a worrying four per cent of the population only washes once a week. At the other end of the scale, 11 per cent of Brits say they wash more than twice a day, with men more likely than women to do so.

    Squeezing the very last drop
    The findings show that even the bathroom is not free from the effects of the credit crunch. The number of people who admit to washing out their bottles of product before they throw them out to ensure not a drop is wasted has risen by seven per cent since last year, with two thirds (67 per cent) doing so. The most frugal of all age groups is the over 65s, with the number washing out bottles jumping to 88 per cent. Young people are the least thrifty, with more than half (53 per cent) not bothering to do so.

    Dr Mark Fielder, a Reader in Medical Microbiology at London's Kingston University, said: "Washing is an important part of human existence and where possible should be carried out daily at least. The human body has its own natural collection of bacteria that exist on the skin and in our gut, and washing helps us keep some form of control on their numbers and location.

    "Not washing regularly means body oil and sweat build up, providing an environment for organisms to thrive and survive. This interaction between our microbes and bodily secretions can result in the release of chemicals that smell and what we term body odour. If regular washing does not take place then dirt and oils build up, skin pores can become blocked and local infections such as boils can start to develop. So overall I would definitely advocate daily washing - it is a simple approach that can really help create a fresher world!"

    Roger Crabb, Marketing Manager for Mira Showers, said: "Our second study into Brits' bathroom habits has not only helped us understand what we really get up to in the shower, but has also given us an insight into our views on the cleanliness of others. Even if you are not too concerned by being clean, people around you are! Showering is not only the quickest and easiest way to freshen up and has even been shown to have beauty benefits as well aiding productivity in the workplace."

    N.B. The information contained in this story is provided by the supplier and does not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of lets-do-diy.com.


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