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    Average fence installation cost


    Summary: How much to install a fence, average fence installation cost and average labour costs.



    Installing a fence is something that anyone with reasonably good DIY skills can accomplish and as is the case with most home improvements, if you can do it yourself it will probably work out cheaper. Hourly rates from tradespeople vary significantly so get at least three quotes if you want a professional to do the installing for you.


    Average cost

    Job

    Average cost

    Updated

    Quote

    Labour & materials (Garden fence)
    £35 - £60 (Per metre)
    2012 Get quote

    Factors to consider

    Planning permission is not required for a timber fence unless it is over two metres high, or one metre high if the fence is next to a public highway used by vehicles. If the fence is going to be in a conservation area or in the grounds of a listed building, then planning permission will also be needed.

    The simplest and cheapest type of fence is made up of traditional lap panels and timber or concrete fence posts. Lap panels are widely available from popular DIY outlets, many of which have a 'bargain' or 'basic' range.

    They are generally a standard width of 1830mm and are available in a range of heights from 910mm, for about £13 to £15 each, up to 1800mm, which you can get for as little as £18 in the value ranges.

    Timber fence posts are about £10 each for 80mm x 1800mm and concrete posts of 100mm x 1800mm aren't much more expensive than timber, so if you need a stronger or more durable post then these are a worthwhile alternative.

    Posts can either be sunk in concrete or installed using a post spike. Spikes start at £6 to £7 depending on size, or a 20kg bag of dry ballast and cement mix is about £5.

    With fencing materials you get what you pay for, so if you choose a bargain panel, don't expect it to last as long as one that is twice the price, particularly the lap variants. If budget is your deciding factor in your project, buy the best that you can with the money available.

    Some suppliers offer deals on combined panel and post packs or post and rail packs, often including the required clips, caps or other fixings as well. This option can work out considerably cheaper even on a relatively short fence and for bigger jobs it really is worth looking around for the best combination offers.

    For land that is uneven or sloped, close board, also referred to as feather edge or feather board, is ideal as it is constructed on site and made to fit the area required. Boards can be bought individually or in multi packs, but as a guide, one 22mm x 100mm x 1800mm board is about £1 to £2 and 38 boards will make up approximately three metres of fence.

    Close board can also be purchased in pre constructed panels that are easy to install without the need for rails and just have to be installed with the relevant fence posts. Many builders merchants do a standard five panel, six post pack starting at about £350.

    Some suppliers offer deals on combined panel and post packs or post and rail packs.

    The simplest and cheapest type of fence is made up of traditional lap panels and timber or concrete fence posts.


    Costs to consider

    Fence prices vary considerably depending on the time of year as installing a fence is a fairly seasonal job. Thus prices will be higher during the warmer months and lower at the end of the summer going into autumn.

    Professionals consider close board to be the most hard wearing and long lasting fencing solution. It is reasonably priced and when installed correctly and weather proofed every couple of years it has the longest possible lifespan, lasting many years.

    To make the fence even more resilient to the elements, concrete posts are recommended, as these are unlikely to need to be replaced unless damaged. All timber products will degrade eventually if they are exposed to the weather, even when appropriately treated, so in the long term it is better to have the option to be able to simply replace rails and boards or panels rather than an entire fence.

    Once you have decided on the type of fence that you require, take time to look into delivery options if you are not in a position to collect the materials yourself. Even a small fence will need far more materials than you can fit in a family car in one trip so delivery by your supplier is generally the only choice for the DIYer.

    Online retailers are often the best for free or low cost delivery deals and large orders sometimes attract free delivery, so check with your supplier as to whether you have to spend a certain amount before the delivery fee is waived.

    This isn't always the case if you order your fence supplies from some DIY stores and require them to deliver, as some operate a banded system depending on where you live. They may charge a hefty delivery fee if you live outside what they consider to be their local area.

    To make the fence even more resilient to the elements, concrete posts are recommended, as these are unlikely to need to be replaced unless damaged.




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