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    Average cost of a hot tub


    Summary: How much does a hot tub cost, average hot tub installation costs and average cost of a hot tub.



    What could be lovelier than inviting your friends for a soak in the hot tub? Grab a drink, a towel, dive in and watch the sunset. The ideal way to chill out, entertain and, some say, keep healthy.

    So what do we mean by a hot tub? In short, a hot tub is a bath large enough for several people to fit into comfortably. They have engines to pump and heat water. They can be both indoors and outdoors. They come equipped with bubbling jets to sooth those tired muscles. Sounds good? Definitely, so what does the home-improver need to consider when making a purchase? With so many styles and brands on the market and with varying prices, how do you know where to start?


    Average cost

    Job

    Average cost

    Updated

    Quote

    Hot tub (Supply & install) £1200 - £8000 2012 n/a
    Running costs £10 - £40 (Per month) 2012 n/a

    Factors to consider

    A good starting point is to work out the area you have to fill. The size of the tub will naturally affect the size of the price tag. And you wouldn't want to rush out and order a tub only to realise it doesn't fit the allocated space. If you fancy an indoor hot tub, for the privacy if nothing else, make sure the floor is going to be able to carry the weight of the tub. Will it need reinforcing? Adequate drainage is another important consideration.

    Hot tubs can be made of different materials. This will influence the frequency of maintenance, which will have a knock on effect on running costs. Also the larger the tub, the greater the maintenance it is going to need.

    The non-professional can install smaller hot tubs, if you are looking to keep costs low. Some companies include 'easy to assemble' small tubs with the DIY enthusiast in mind. If you want to build one from scratch you are going to need the skills of a plumber, an electrician and possibly a carpenter. And remember, water and electricity can be a fatal combination. It seems sensible to spend some time researching hot tubs before actually ordering the parts. There are several 'how to' guides online and in print. There are companies supplying hot tub parts over the Internet and you could approach them by phone or email to talk through everything you are going to need.

    You may prefer the convenience of a professional installation. Here's some good news. Many outdoor hot tubs are delivered ready to go. Once they have been located in that perfect garden spot, you just fill them up with the garden hose, flick the switch and jump in. However, if you decide the tub looks a bit conspicuous in the garden, adding decking or a cabin to give that spa ambience is a major cost implication.

    Whilst hot tubs do not require planning permission, erecting a cabin in the back garden to contain the tub might. As soon as you start considering gazebos, hot tub enclosures or any structure with walls and a canopy you would be well advised to check with your local authority first. The same applies to building regulations. Approval for planning permission and building regulation naturally incur fees.

    However, if you have plumped for an outdoor tub, you might want to ensure the neighbours are sympathetic. The tub's running engine might annoy them, leading to complaints to the local authority about noise pollution. Maybe they should be the first guests for a dip?

    An indoor hot tub, on the other hand, will come with plumbing needs. So the cost of professional installation will vary depending on the location of the tub, inside or outside. Spend time visiting company web sites to weigh up these factors first.

    You may prefer the convenience of a professional installation. Here's some good news. Many outdoor hot tubs are delivered ready to go.

    The ideal way to chill out, entertain and, some say, keep healthy.

    An indoor hot tub, on the other hand, will come with plumbing needs.


    Costs to consider

    The costs of running a hot tub include the electricity it uses to stay hot, the chemicals needed to keep the water hygienic and regular maintenance checks. The tub not only uses electricity while you are sitting in it, pumps and engines need to run daily to keep in good working order. The chemicals prevent lime scale build up, mould and keep the water sanitized. Experts advise testing the water every two to three weeks to see if it needs replacing. You need to scrub the surfaces clean at least monthly, just as you would your bathtub. You also need to inspect your filter cartridge from time to time. The filters help keep the water clean and strain out anything that may have fallen in. If you are negligent in keeping the tub well maintained the chances are it will break down faster, needing costly repairs. Hot tubs usually come with a cover and, when not in use, this keeps the water warm and minimizes evaporation, cutting down on running costs.

    Experts advise testing the water every two to three weeks to see if it needs replacing.




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