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    Average roof replacement cost


    Summary: How much does it cost to replace a roof, average labour costs and average cost of materials.



    If your next do-it-yourself project involves replacing a roof, you may be quite daunted at the prospect. However, with some good information and a willing attitude, this job could be tackled by most do-it-yourself enthusiasts. Probably the most important consideration here aside from cost would be whether you are good with heights. If the answer is no, then you already know that you will need to hire a professional roofing company. You could still save yourself some money though, by making sure you shop around and obtaining at least 3 quotes from reputable companies with good track records. Make sure you obtain detailed quotes and look for guarantees on materials as well as workmanship to ensure complete peace of mind.


    Average cost

    Job

    Average cost

    Updated

    Quote

    Flat roof (Labour & materials) £400 - £3600 (Per roof) 2012 Get quote
    Sloping roof (Labour & materials) £4000 - £18000 (Per roof) 2012 Get quote
    Re-tile roof (Labour & materials) £50 - £110 (m²) 2012 Get quote

    Factors to consider

    The type of roof you are replacing, for example a flat roof, rubber, slate or tile, will reflect in the overall cost, not to mention the level of difficulty associated with each. If you intend to replace a shed roof for example, then this is a job most do-it-yourself enthusiasts would be likely to attempt themselves, as height will most likely not pose too much of a problem. However, if your task concerns replacing or repairing the roof of a two-storey house, then height will become a much bigger issue. Even if your property is a bungalow, height should be taken into consideration and ideally, scaffolding should be used which will obviously add to cost. Safety has to be a priority and using a ladder alone could add to the risk involved.

    Planning permission should not be an issue, although you might need to ensure that any new roof you intend to put on your property meets local regulations regarding style and colour. Often there are strict guidelines to ensure properties remain 'in keeping' with their area.

    Even if your property is a bungalow, height should be taken into consideration and ideally, scaffolding should be used which will obviously add to cost.


    Costs to consider

    Flat roofs come in many materials and are usually cheaper than sloping roofs. Materials used for flat roofs consist of asphalt, bitumen, PVC and synthetic rubber to name a few and they must all be coated to prevent sun damage and degradation. As well as the base and the coating, flat roofs also require flashing to prevent water leakage and should be inspected for damage at least annually. An advantage of flat roofs is the fact that you are less likely to fall off while carrying out inspections or repairs and they are more easily accessible, however their make-up means that they will not be as long lasting as their sloping roof equivalents.

    For sloping roofs, your roof should ideally be fitted with a protective watertight membrane and battened. Slate will provide years of worry free protection and is well suited to the British weather, capable of withstanding lots of rain, wind and snow. Slate is said to last 100 years, but for any type of tile, these should be inspected regularly as any broken tiles which are not replaced will eventually allow water to seep through to your attic and cause a potentially bigger problem. Although guaranteed to last, slate tiles are more expensive and more time consuming as each slate needs to be nailed into place individually. The quickest type of tiles to fit are single lap interlocking tiles which, as their names suggests, simply hook on and overlap each other. These are most commonly made from concrete; however they are also available in alternative materials. Plain tiles are another option and again these are usually made from concrete or clay. If you intend to replace a clay tile with a concrete one, bear in mind that concrete tiles are heavier so it will be important to make sure your roof structure will be able to withstand the heavier weight. Metal roofs, using corrugated sheets are another roofing style. This type of roof is not suitable if you live near the sea, as the salt water and sea air are corrosive, meaning your roof will need to be replaced on a fairly regular basis which will not be cost effective.

    Replacing your roof can be an expensive project and can also be quite time consuming, however, in the long run it is one of those jobs that is worth doing right, as your roof protects your most valuable asset, your home. Ensuring a water-tight cover will not only add value to your property but will also help to reduce heating costs as your home will be free from draughts and leaks, making it more energy efficient. Your roof is your home's defining feature so do your homework and make sure the roof over your head is a good one.

    Plain tiles are another option and again these are usually made from concrete or clay.

    For sloping roofs, your roof should ideally be fitted with a protective watertight membrane and battened.

    Slate will provide years of worry free protection and is well suited to the British weather.




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